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Force and Violence in the Family

William J. Goode
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 33, No. 4, Special Double Issue: Violence and the Family and Sexism in Family Studies, Part 2 (Nov., 1971), pp. 624-636
DOI: 10.2307/349435
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/349435
Page Count: 13
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Force and Violence in the Family
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Abstract

The family, like all other social units, is a power system, resting to some degree on force or its threat. This paper examines the deterrent value of the actual use of force and the implied deterrent of its threat, as well as the outside supports of the use of force in the family which come from the state, the community, friends, and so on. The role of force in socialization is discussed (with some cross-cultural illustration from the case of Japan), and a series of propositions are presented. A final section explores force which emerges into violence as assault, murder and child abuse, from an exchange perspective.

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