Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Using Insect Sounds to Estimate and Monitor Their Populations

T. G. Forrest
The Florida Entomologist
Vol. 71, No. 4 (Dec., 1988), pp. 416-426
DOI: 10.2307/3495001
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3495001
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Using Insect Sounds to Estimate and Monitor Their Populations
Preview not available

Abstract

Accurate estimates of population size are needed to understand the population dynamics of any species. They are also needed to determine when to implement a specific control tactic, and to measure whether that control tactic has been effective. This paper discusses the use of acoustic signals produced by insects and the feasibility of using these signals to census populations. Insect sounds are either incidental (produced as a by-product of some activity) or non-incidental (produced to cause a response in some other animal). Incidental sounds differ from non-incidental sounds with respect to several features that are important to using sound to census populations. These features include species specificity, frequency content, ease of localization, distance traveled, and the duration and timing of sound production. Studies of crickets show that information about which individuals in a population are producing sound, when the individuals produce sound (seasonally and daily), and the probability that individuals produce sound during census periods must be known to accurately estimate the size of a population. /// Se necesitan estimados precisos del tamaño de la población para entender el dinamismo de la población de cualquier especie. También se necesitan para determinar cuándo es necesario implementar una táctica específica de control, y para medir la efectividad de dicha táctica. Se discute el uso de señales acústicas producidas por insectos y la posibilidad de usarlas en censos de poblaciones. Los sonidos producidos por insectos son incidentales (producidos como producto secundario de otra actividad) o no incidentales (producidos para inducir una respuesta en otro animal) Los sonidos incidentales difieren de los no incidentales con respecto a algunas características que son importantes en el uso del sonido en el censo de poblaciones. Estas características incluyen especificidad de las especies, el contenido de la frecuencia, la facilidad en localizarla, distancia cubierta, y la duración y lo oportuno del sonido producido. Estudios hechos con grillos muestran oue se debe de tener información sobre aquellos individuos que producen sonidos en la población, cuándo producen los sonidos (diariamente y estacionalmente), y la probabilidad que los individuos produzcan sonidos durante el censo para poder estimar con exactitud el tamaño de la población.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426