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Male Transfer of Materials to Mates in the Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)

John Sivinski and Burrell Smittle
The Florida Entomologist
Vol. 70, No. 2 (Jun., 1987), pp. 233-238
DOI: 10.2307/3495154
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3495154
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Male Transfer of Materials to Mates in the Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)
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Abstract

In the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), females prefer to mate with large males. One explanation for this preference is a greater paternal investment passed in the ejaculate of bigger males. Tests conducted with radioactive males indicate that material from males moves from the spermathecae into unfertilized eggs in the ovaries and somatic tissue, suggesting female use of male resources. However, the amount of substance transferred was so small (an estimated 0.0001 of the male's body weight) that its role as a paternal investment and the basis of female choice is questionable. /// Hembras de la mosca del Caribe, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) prefieren acoplarse con machos grandes. Una explicación de esta preferencia es la de una inversión paternal que es pasada en la ejaculación de los machos más grandes. Pruebas hechas con machos radioactivos indican que el producto de los machos se mueve de la espermacica hacia los huevos no fertilizados en los ovarios y los tejidos somáticos, sugiriendo el usa de recurso de los machos por las hembras. Sin embargo, la cantidad de sustancias transferidas fue tan pequeña (un estimado de 0.0001 del peso del macho), que su papel como una contribución paternal y como base de preferencia de las hembras es puesto en duda.

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