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The One-Person Household: A Consequence of the Isolated Nuclear Family?

John C. Belcher
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 29, No. 3 (Aug., 1967), pp. 534-540
DOI: 10.2307/349599
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/349599
Page Count: 7
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The One-Person Household: A Consequence of the Isolated Nuclear Family?
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Abstract

The number of people living alone is increasing much more rapidly than the total population of the United States. In the period since 1960, approximately one-third of all new households contain but one person. Data from the one-in-a-thousand sample of the 1960 Census of Population are analyzed to determine the demographic characteristics of the one-person household as well as to formulate explanations for their increase. The hypothesis is advanced that the primary reason for this increase is the dominance of the small nuclear family.

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