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The Influence of Parents and Peers during Adolescence: The Situation Hypothesis Revisited

Lyle E. Larson
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 34, No. 1 (Feb., 1972), pp. 67-74
DOI: 10.2307/349631
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/349631
Page Count: 8
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The Influence of Parents and Peers during Adolescence: The Situation Hypothesis Revisited
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Abstract

Previous research has shown that youth tend to follow parental wishes in future oriented situations and peer wishes in current oriented situations. This paper evaluates this assumption and explores the utility of differing types of situations in measuring the parent and peer orientations of youth. It is found that (a) the content of the situation is more important in the choice of courses of action than the pressures of either parents or peers, and (b) parent-peer orientations have a systematic, but minimal influence, on choice.

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