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Urbanism, Ethnicity, and Extended Familism

Robert F. Winch and Scott A. Greer
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Feb., 1968), pp. 40-45
DOI: 10.2307/350220
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350220
Page Count: 6
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Urbanism, Ethnicity, and Extended Familism
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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to contribute toward the explanation of why some people do and others do not engage in extended familism, i.e., participate in the network of their kinsmen. First, we shall take recourse to two independent variables familiar to the sociologist: the rural-urban continuum and ethnicity. Then we shall see whether or not we can make the observed correlations disappear when we control for socioeconomic status and for migratory status.

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