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Divorce among Doctors

Irving Rosow and K. Daniel Rose
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 34, No. 4 (Nov., 1972), pp. 587-598
DOI: 10.2307/350309
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350309
Page Count: 12
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Divorce among Doctors
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Abstract

Analysis of California divorce petitions of 1968 shows that doctors have very low divorce rates. They are married later and longer than other divorcing professionals, and marriages break up at the height, not the outset of their careers. The highest divorce rates in the profession, each posing special problems, appear among women, blacks, and small-town doctors. Blacks may reflect unusual mobility strains because of sharp racial differences in the sex ratios of the college-educated. Peripheral specialists who see few patients have more stable marriages; those in more stressful specialties may incur a greater divorce risk. Divorce-prone persons do not gravitate to particular kinds of professions or medical specialties.

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