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Effects of Neem (Azadirachta indica L.) Products on Feeding, Metamorphosis, Mortality, and Behavior of the Variegated Grasshopper, Zonocerus variegata (L.)(Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)

Martin Baumgart
Journal of Orthoptera Research
No. 4 (Aug., 1995), pp. 19-28
Published by: Orthopterists' Society
DOI: 10.2307/3503454
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3503454
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Neem (Azadirachta indica L.) Products on Feeding, Metamorphosis, Mortality, and Behavior of the Variegated Grasshopper, Zonocerus variegata (L.)(Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)
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Abstract

To evaluate the effects of natural and formulated neem seed extracts (Azadirachta indica A. Juss), pure and Azadirachtin-enriched neem oil were tested on first and second instar nymphs of the variegated grasshopper, Zonocerus variegatus (L.), in laboratory, field cage, and field trials in the Republic of Benin (West Africa). All investigated neem products demonstrated a strong antifeedant effect. Feeding activity was also reduced when neem oil was topically applied to nymphs. Eight days after application mortality rates reached between 40 and 50%. These results are of practical relevance, since pronounced morphogenetic defects to antennae, wings, and legs occurred within the surviving population. The effects of neem oil on aggregation behavior of nymphs under field conditions proved to be very effective in reducing grasshopper populations to acceptable levels.

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