Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Primary Individual and the Family: Changes in Living Arrangements in the United States since 1940

Frances E. Kobrin
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 38, No. 2 (May, 1976), pp. 233-239
DOI: 10.2307/350383
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350383
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Primary Individual and the Family: Changes in Living Arrangements in the United States since 1940
Preview not available

Abstract

Census data on living arrangements are presented to show that increasing proportions of the adult population in the U.S. are living alone or apart from relatives. Those involved are primarily either quite young (males) or relatively older (females). This paper proposes a view of the relationship of family membership to the life cycle which includes three stages during adulthood: (1) premarital independence, (2) marriage, and (3) postfamily independence. The development of such clear stages implies that segregation by age, both within and outside families, is increasing, and that the family is declining as a locus of primary relationships.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239