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Family Structure and Independence Training in a Taiwanese Village

Nancy J. Olsen
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 35, No. 3, Special Section: New Social History of the Family (Aug., 1973), pp. 512-519
DOI: 10.2307/350587
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350587
Page Count: 8
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Family Structure and Independence Training in a Taiwanese Village
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Abstract

Data collected in a Taiwanese village were used to test predictions derived from Lambert's exchange theory of family structure differences in child training (1971). Thirty-seven women with children between the ages of 4 and 10 were interviewed about their socialization practices, and a number of questions concerning independence training were selected for analysis. As predicted, mothers in extended families were considerably less likely to train their children to be self-reliant, but it was not clear that this difference could be attributed to the grandmother's role as a "low-cost" parental surrogate. Several alternative explanations are considered.

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