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'De cette triste plume tâtonnante': Henry James and 'The Task of the Translator'

Nicola Bradbury
The Yearbook of English Studies
Vol. 36, No. 1, Translation (2006), pp. 138-144
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3508742
Page Count: 7
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'De cette triste plume tâtonnante': Henry James and 'The Task of the Translator'
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Abstract

Henry James's approach to translation can both be situated in the American tradition of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman and related to Walter Benjamin's essay on 'The Task of the Translator'. James's dialogical dynamic in the New York Prefaces extends his practice in the Notebooks and his fiction: a mode of composition corresponding to his personal history, engaging in perpetual 'translation'.

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