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The Impact of Marital Disruption and Remarriage on Fertility

Sarah Betsy Cohen and James A. Sweet
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 36, No. 1 (Feb., 1974), pp. 87-96
DOI: 10.2307/350998
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350998
Page Count: 10
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The Impact of Marital Disruption and Remarriage on Fertility
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Abstract

Using data from the 1965 National Fertility Study we examine the differential in fertility by whether a woman's first marriage was terminated by divorce or death of spouse, or whether it was still intact at the time of interview. For women 25 to 54 in 1965 we find: (1) controlling for age and race differentials women whose first marriage was terminated by divorce have.14 children fewer than those who remain in intact first marriages; (2) this is an understatement of the overall differential in fertility since women who have experienced divorce have an earlier age at marriage and thus higher fertility. When we take this fact into account the fertility deficit is about 0.6 children; (3) about one-half of the remaining differential is attributable to the higher incidence of childlessness among the divorced; (4) the fertility deficit is reduced to about 0.1 children when we control for months of "exposure" spent in a married state.

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