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Widowhood, Morale, and Affiliation

Carol D. Harvey and Howard M. Bahr
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 36, No. 1 (Feb., 1974), pp. 97-106
DOI: 10.2307/350999
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350999
Page Count: 10
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Widowhood, Morale, and Affiliation
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Abstract

Data from sample surveys in five nations are examined in an assessment of the attitudes and affiliative ties of widowed and married persons. Results suggest that (1) neither self-theory nor role-theory perspectives are adequate to explain the differentials which appear, and (2) the negative, long-term consequences of widowhood seem to derive from socioeconomic deprivation rather than widowhood itself. The widowed have seemed to have lower morale and to be less affiliated than the married because they are much poorer than married people. Researchers must apply adequate controls for economic status if the social and psychological impacts of widowhood are to be distinguished from the effects of poverty.

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