Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Rise and Decline of Sokagakkai Japan and the United States

Hideo Hashimoto and William McPherson
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 17, No. 2 (Winter, 1976), pp. 82-92
DOI: 10.2307/3510626
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3510626
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Rise and Decline of Sokagakkai Japan and the United States
Preview not available

Abstract

The following article is based on a synthesis of the Snook theory of conventional v. unconventional religion and the Glock and Stark thesis of deprivation. This synthesis is applied to Sokagakkai in Japan and the U.S. with emphasis on the membership, history, and doctrines of the parent groups and its overseas offspring. While divergent in some respects, the two branches have represented religious tendencies toward marginality and sectarianism. At the present time they are showing signs of slowing down in rate of growth, accompanied by tendencies toward conventionality.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92