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Religious Belief as a Factor in Obedience to Destructive Commands

David C. Bock and Neil Clark Warren
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 13, No. 3, Denominational and Interdenominational Studies (Spring, 1972), pp. 185-191
DOI: 10.2307/3510781
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3510781
Page Count: 7
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Religious Belief as a Factor in Obedience to Destructive Commands
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Abstract

Thirty subjects selected from a college population were evaluated according to three religious beliefs' scales. They were subsequently exposed to a modified version of Milgram's (1963) procedure in which they were instructed to administer "shocks" to a victim for supposed "errors" on a learning task. Although it was hypothesized that persons scoring in the mid-range of religious scales would be less obedient than extremes, it was in fact found that moderate believers administered significantly more punishment than either the religious or nonreligious extremes.

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