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Church Attendance and Traditional Religious Beliefs in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Panel Study

Fern K. Willits and Donald M. Crider
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 31, No. 1 (Sep., 1989), pp. 68-81
DOI: 10.2307/3511025
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3511025
Page Count: 14
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Church Attendance and Traditional Religious Beliefs in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Panel Study
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Abstract

Utilizing data from a sample of persons first surveyed in 1970 when they were high school students and restudied in 1981, this analysis found that, as adolescents, the subjects reported highly traditional religious beliefs and frequent church attendance. Although they saw themselves as attending worship services somewhat more frequently than their parents, youthful attendance and beliefs were significantly correlated with perceived parental attendance. Ten years later, the subject's church attendance had declined and earlier parental patterns had no direct effect on attendance or belief. Frequency of spouse's church attendance was importantly linked with the respondent's own attendance and religious beliefs in young adulthood.

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