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Religious Commitment, Yuppie Values, and Well-Being in Post-Collegiate Life

H. Wesley Perkins
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 32, No. 3 (Mar., 1991), pp. 244-251
DOI: 10.2307/3511209
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3511209
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Religious Commitment, Yuppie Values, and Well-Being in Post-Collegiate Life
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Abstract

Much popular attention was paid to the emergence of the "yuppie" (young, urban, and upwardly mobile professional) in the 1980s as an influential demographic group and as a new lifestyle and value orientation that places extreme emphasis on the pursuit of financial rewards and career success. Although little empirical research exists, yuppies have also been characterized as working extremely long hours in high stress positions, devoting themselves to exercise and health foods, and having relatively little interest in traditional religious faiths. Based on a tradition of research on religion and well-being, especially on younger age groups, this study examines the relationships among religiosity, yuppie values, and measures of well-being with data from baby boom cohorts of young, college educated adults (N = 860), many of whom move into the yuppie ranks. Young adults with greater religious commitment were less yuppie oriented in their values and reported less problematic alcohol use. The more yuppie oriented respondents did not exhibit a more healthy lifestyle on any measure, but instead, smoked more often and, among women, consumed more alcohol and were more likely to report a possible eating disorder. A general sense of unhappiness was much more prevalent among respondents who simultaneously had little religious commitment and a strong yuppie orientation in comparison with all other post-collegians.

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