Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Theology and Religiosity Effects on Environmentalism

Eric Woodrum and Thomas Hoban
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 35, No. 3 (Mar., 1994), pp. 193-206
DOI: 10.2307/3511888
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3511888
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Theology and Religiosity Effects on Environmentalism
Preview not available

Abstract

Lynn White and others contend the dominion belief that the Bible authorizes humans to use nature to our own advantage justifies exploitation of the earth. Extreme versions of this view hold Judeo-Christian religious institutions accountable for the environmental crisis. This study assesses those arguments with original survey data from a state-wide sample. Dominion beliefs are prevalent in this sample, especially among those with little formal education or information about environmental matters. These findings are consistent with White's thesis. But, dominion beliefs are not predictable on the basis of such conventional religiosity indicators as religious salience or worship frequency. These data do not show a significant association between dominion beliefs and Biblical literalism or support for creationism in schools even though deductive logic would lead one to assume such a pattern. We conclude that dominion beliefs may be a correlate of environmental apathy, but they are not significantly associated with conventional religiosity on the individual level. On the institutional level this study finds no empirical basis for singling out churches as culpable for environmental problems. Continued expansion of stewardship interpretations of faith will be well received by many church members.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206