Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

National Religious Context and Familial Religiosity within a Jewish Framework

Bernard Lazerwitz and Ephraim Tabory
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 44, No. 1 (Sep., 2002), pp. 22-37
DOI: 10.2307/3512155
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3512155
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
National Religious Context and Familial Religiosity within a Jewish Framework
Preview not available

Abstract

Kelley and De Graaf studied the relationship between national and familial religiosity in 15 Christian societies. They found that secular people living in religious societies acquire more orthodox Christian beliefs than similar persons living in secular societies do. We examine whether their findings can be extended to societies that are not Christian by contrasting Jewish religiosity in the United States with Jewish religiosity in Israel. Extensive surveys of American and Israeli Jews enable us to examine the impact of similar and dissimilar societal religious contexts. The survey data indicate that the overall religious level of Israeli society is on a par with the United States. We find that there is an interaction effect. On the whole, Israeli Jewry has an enhanced level of religiosity which is higher than that of American Jews, even for those who belong to the American Orthodox denomination. Israeli secular Jews are found to acquire enhanced religiosity characteristics from their surrounding majority Jewish society. Secular American Jews do acquire Christian religiosity traits and display religious service attendance levels considerably below that of their surrounding Christian society.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37