Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A National Survey of the Sexual Trauma Experiences of Catholic Nuns

John T. Chibnall, Ann Wolf and Paul N. Duckro
Review of Religious Research
Vol. 40, No. 2 (Dec., 1998), pp. 142-167
DOI: 10.2307/3512299
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3512299
Page Count: 26
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available

Abstract

Much of the research on sexual trauma and religion has focused on male clergy perpetrators and child sexual abuse. In response to this limitation, we conducted a national survey of sexual trauma among Catholic nuns. Sexual trauma was not uncommon, both across the lifespan and during religious life. Childhood sexual abuse was most prevalent (although lower than in the general population), followed by sexual exploitation (primarily by priests and nuns), sexual harassment within the religious community (exclusively by nuns), and sexual harassment at work (primarily by men, both clergy and lay). Past and current sequelae of the trauma included psychological and spiritual dysfunction. Childhood sexual abuse consistently predicted sexual re-victimization in adulthood. The severity of the abuse, age of the victim, and gender and religious status of the abuser modified victims' reactions to and willingness to discuss the trauma. These findings have implications for education, intervention, and policy in religious communities with respect to sexual trauma, and may prove useful to health professionals who treat abused women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167