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Husband-Wife Communication, Wife's Employment, and the Decision for Male or Female Sterilization

Frank D. Bean, Margaret Pruitt Clark, Gray Swicegood and Dorie Williams
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 45, No. 2 (May, 1983), pp. 395-403
DOI: 10.2307/351517
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351517
Page Count: 9
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Husband-Wife Communication, Wife's Employment, and the Decision for Male or Female Sterilization
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Abstract

Using data collected for both husbands and wives from 313 couples electing voluntary sterilization, this research examines the relationship between perceptions of marital communication on the part of both husband and wife and the kind (male or female) of sterilization procedure chosen. The general hypothesis tested is that the likelihood of choosing a female procedure is negatively related to perceptions of marital communication, especially among wives. The perceptions of husband and wife are also hypothesized to interact in their effects on the decision—the probability of a female procedure increasing more rapidly with decreasing assessment of communication, the greater the assessment of the other spouse. This pattern is also predicted to be more characteristic of couples in which the wife does not work. Regression analyses of the data reveal support for the hypotheses. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for certain theoretical questions.

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