Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Social Determinants of Age at First Birth

Ronald R. Rindfuss and Craig St. John
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 45, No. 3 (Aug., 1983), pp. 553-565
DOI: 10.2307/351660
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/351660
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Social Determinants of Age at First Birth
Preview not available

Abstract

A woman's first birth is one of the most significant events in her life. It signifies her taking on the roles and responsibilities of a mother, often to the exclusion of further education and career-building roles. The earlier these roles and responsibilities are undertaken, the less likely are alternatives to be taken and the greater is the expected quantity and pace of subsequent childbearing. Consequently, this paper explores the social determinants of the timing of the first birth. A model is developed and tested in which a number of social factors are hypothesized to affect age at first birth. Age at first birth is allowed to have a reciprocal effect on education; thus, the model is nonrecursive. Education at marriage is the most important predictor of age at first birth, and the relationship is positive. Although a few social determinants do have a direct effect on age at first birth (such as race, religion, and smoking at young ages), most determinants affect age at first birth through education.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558
  • Thumbnail: Page 
559
    559
  • Thumbnail: Page 
560
    560
  • Thumbnail: Page 
561
    561
  • Thumbnail: Page 
562
    562
  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563
  • Thumbnail: Page 
564
    564
  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565