Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Social-Psychological Factors in Perinatal Labor-Force Participation

Theodore N. Greenstein
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Aug., 1986), pp. 565-571
DOI: 10.2307/352042
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352042
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Social-Psychological Factors in Perinatal Labor-Force Participation
Preview not available

Abstract

Using material from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Young Women, this study analyzes eight years of panel data from 895 white married women, with husband present, who had a first birth prior to the 1978 interview. The purpose of this research was to investigate social-psychological factors that may affect exit from the labor force prior to the birth event and reentry following the birth event. Covariance analyses suggest (a) that there is a large and statistically significant effect of attitude toward married women in the work force on labor-force participation throughout the perinatal period (women with more favorable attitudes were more likely to be in the labor force); and (b) that the effect of attitude toward married women in the work force on perinatal labor-force participation is stronger than that of proximity to the birth event, age, age at first marriage, husband's income, or education.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
567
    567
  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568
  • Thumbnail: Page 
569
    569
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571