Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Updating Children's Life Course

Sandra L. Hofferth
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 47, No. 1 (Feb., 1985), pp. 93-115
DOI: 10.2307/352072
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352072
Page Count: 23
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Updating Children's Life Course
Preview not available

Abstract

Dramatic changes have occurred in children's family experiences, and these changes are even more dramatic when actual living arrangements, not just parental marital statuses, are considered. According to data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, by age 17, 19% of white children born in 1950-1954 had lived with only one parent. By age 17, 70% of white children born in 1980 are projected to have spent at least some time with only one parent before they reach age 18. The proportion was 48% for black children born in 1950-1954 and is projected to be 94% for black children born in 1980. Of course, these figures do not indicate the actual proportion of their lives children spend in various family types. White children born in 1950-1954 could expect to spend 8% of their childhood with only one parent, black children 22%. Of those children born in 1980, white children can be expected to spend 31% of their childhood years with one parent, black children 59%. Children's experience depends on family type at birth. Sixty-four percent of white children born in 1980 into a first-marriage family could expect to live at some point in a one-parent family by age 17; they could expect to spend 25% of their childhood in such a family. The comparable figures are 89% and 44% for black children born in the same year.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115