Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The One-Child Population Policy, Modernization, and the Extended Chinese Family

Xiangming Chen
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 47, No. 1 (Feb., 1985), pp. 193-202
DOI: 10.2307/352082
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352082
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The One-Child Population Policy, Modernization, and the Extended Chinese Family
Preview not available

Abstract

Demographic processes and socioeconomic developments alter the traditional ways of household formation and family structure, as has been shown by changes in the family patterns in Western societies. Will the same changes take place in the traditional extended family in China as the world's largest nation carries out a rigorous one-child family policy and a strong modernization program? This paper examines structural, social-psychological and ecological factors affecting the direction and type of changes occurring in the Chinese family. It is concluded that multiple demographic and socioeconomic influences and the family's adaptive responses are creating conditions in China for the traditional household arrangement to survive, while generating new variants of family organization.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202