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Size of Informal Helper Network Mobilized during a Serious Personal Problem among Black Americans

Linda M. Chatters, Robert Joseph Taylor and Harold W. Neighbors
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 51, No. 3 (Aug., 1989), pp. 667-676
DOI: 10.2307/352166
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352166
Page Count: 10
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Size of Informal Helper Network Mobilized during a Serious Personal Problem among Black Americans
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Abstract

The number of informal helpers who are utilized during a serious personal problem was examined among a national sample of black adults. Kin were more prevalent in the helper network than nonkin. Multivariate analysis indicated that network size was predicted by age, gender, income, familial contact, and type of problem. An interaction between age and having a child substantiated the importance of adult children in maintaining the informal support networks of older adults. The discussion highlights the significance of the informal network in providing assistance during a personal crisis.

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