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Generalization and Containment: Different Effects of Past Aggression for Wives and Husbands

Jean Malone, Andrea Tyree and K. Daniel O'Leary
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 51, No. 3 (Aug., 1989), pp. 687-697
DOI: 10.2307/352168
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352168
Page Count: 11
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Generalization and Containment: Different Effects of Past Aggression for Wives and Husbands
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Abstract

In a study of the etiology of physical aggression toward spouses, 328 community couples were assessed 6 weeks prior to marriage, and 6 and 18 months after marriage. Although men reported higher rates of violent activities outside of the home, men and women reported experiencing and engaging in similar amounts of physical aggression within their families of origin and against their spouses. However, both regression analyses and canonical analyses indicated that physical aggression toward a spouse was more predictable for females than males. In brief, if women were aggressive, they were more likely than men to generalize their aggression from one type of relationship to another.

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