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More Young Adults Are Living with Their Parents: Who Are They?

Paul C. Glick and Sung-Ling Lin
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Feb., 1986), pp. 107-112
DOI: 10.2307/352233
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352233
Page Count: 6
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More Young Adults Are Living with Their Parents: Who Are They?
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Abstract

From a high point in 1940, near the end of the economic depression of the 1930s, the proportion of persons 18 to 29 years of age who were living with their parents declined to a low point in 1960, near the end of the baby boom, and rose moderately by 1984. The recent increase occurred during several years of high rates of marriage postponement, college enrollment, unemployment, divorce, and births to unmarried mothers. This paper documents the changes since 1940 and presents selected demographic characteristics of young adults living in their parental homes in 1980. The tables are based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau's decennial censuses and Current Population Survey.

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