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A Longitudinal Comparison of Consumption and Finance Handling between Happily Married and Divorced Couples

Charles M. Schaninger and W. Christian Buss
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Feb., 1986), pp. 129-136
DOI: 10.2307/352236
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352236
Page Count: 8
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A Longitudinal Comparison of Consumption and Finance Handling between Happily Married and Divorced Couples
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Abstract

A longitudinal panel study of newly married couples is utilized to examine hypothesized consumption and finance-handling differences between couples who subsequently become divorced or remained happily married. Happily married couples were found to practice role specialization, with greater influence of the wife and less husband dominance in family finance handling, and greater joint and wife influence in decision making. Compared to divorced couples, they spent more for household appliances, home purchases and down payments, and recreational vehicles, as hypothesized. Divorced couples spent more on stereos and color TVs, as well as living-room furniture.

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