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Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation

Aaron Antonovsky and Talma Sourani
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 50, No. 1 (Feb., 1988), pp. 79-92
DOI: 10.2307/352429
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352429
Page Count: 14
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Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation
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Abstract

The sense of coherence (SOC) is a construct that refers to the extent to which one sees one's world as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful. This article applies the SOC construct to the study of family adaptation. A family SOC scale was developed to measure the perceived coherence of family life. The study tested the hypothesis that the strength of the SOC, central to successful coping with family stressors, is associated with adaptation, here defined in terms of perceived satisfaction with intrafamily and family-community fit. A sample of 60 married Israeli males who were disabled by injury or illness completed SOC and adaptation scales, along with their wives. The data provide strong support for the hypothesis and show a considerable degree of consensus among spouses. The discussion considers the dual meaning of the term "the family SOC," the nature of the links between coherence and adaptation, and the variable conceptions of adaptation.

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