Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Kin Networks, Race, and Family Structure

Sandra L. Hofferth
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 46, No. 4 (Nov., 1984), pp. 791-806
DOI: 10.2307/352527
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352527
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Kin Networks, Race, and Family Structure
Preview not available

Abstract

Data from a national survey of families show that black and white families with children under 18 differ in kin network participation. White families are more likely than black families to receive money from outside relatives; black families are more likely than white families to live with others in an extended family household. Among female-headed families, white families are still more likely than black families to receive money, but the relationship between race and extendedness disappears. The apparent relationship between race and extendedness appears to be due entirely to marital status differences between white and black female family heads. Overall, because black female-headed families are less likely to receive money from other families, black female-headed families appear to benefit less than white female-headed families from a kin network.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
  • Thumbnail: Page 
802
    802
  • Thumbnail: Page 
803
    803
  • Thumbnail: Page 
804
    804
  • Thumbnail: Page 
805
    805
  • Thumbnail: Page 
806
    806