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Religious Homogamy and Marital Satisfaction Reconsidered

Tim B. Heaton
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 46, No. 3 (Aug., 1984), pp. 729-733
DOI: 10.2307/352615
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352615
Page Count: 5
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Religious Homogamy and Marital Satisfaction Reconsidered
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Abstract

The relationship between religious homogamy and marital satisfaction is examined utilizing log-linear models. Inclusion of the separate effects of husband's and wife's religion on marital satisfaction allows us to control for the potentially spurious relationship between religious affiliation and marital satisfaction. Results indicate that homogamous marriages are more satisfying. In order to test the hypothesis that dissatisfaction in heterogeneous marriages arises over conflict regarding socialization of children, the presence of children is included. The hypothesis is discounted, since the homogamy effect remains significant. When frequency of religious attendance is included, however, the homogamy effect becomes nonsignificant, suggesting that patterns of religious involvement underlie higher satisfaction within homogamous marriages.

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