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Marital Reconciliation in the United States: Which Couples Are Successful?

Howard Wineberg
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 56, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), pp. 80-88
DOI: 10.2307/352703
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352703
Page Count: 9
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Marital Reconciliation in the United States: Which Couples Are Successful?
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Abstract

Using 1987-88 National Survey of Families and Household data, this study examines the prevalence of successful reconciliations among 506 white women in the United States. Approximately one-third of the women attempting a reconciliation are still married more than 1 year after the reconciliation began. The probability of having a successful reconciliation varies among subgroups of women. Religion has the strongest relationship with the success of a reconciliation, followed by premarital cohabitation, and age homogamy of the spouses. Other variables related to marital dissolution are not significantly associated with whether or not a reconciliation is successful: education, parity, age at separation, and duration between marriage and separation.

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