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Effects of Maternal Employment Experiences on Children's Behavior via Mood, Cognitive Difficulties, and Parenting Behavior

Karyl E. MacEwen and Julian Barling
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Aug., 1991), pp. 635-644
DOI: 10.2307/352739
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352739
Page Count: 10
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Effects of Maternal Employment Experiences on Children's Behavior via Mood, Cognitive Difficulties, and Parenting Behavior
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Abstract

Research now indicates that mothers' experiences of employment are more predictive of children's behavior than is mothers' employment status. A four-stage model of how mothers' interrole conflict and satisfaction with the role of employed mother affect children's behavior was developed and tested by using path analysis. In a sample of 147 employed mothers, the model provided an excellent fit to the data. The relationship between maternal employment role experiences (interrole conflict and satisfaction with maternal employment) and children's behavior (attention/immaturity, conduct disorder, and anxiety/withdrawal) was mediated by personal strain (cognitive difficulties and negative mood) and parenting behavior (punishment and rejection).

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