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Women with Multiple Roles: Role-Compatibility Perceptions, Satisfaction, and Mental Health

Linda Beth Tiedje, Camille B. Wortman, Geraldine Downey, Carol Emmons, Monica Biernat and Eric Lang
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 52, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 63-72
DOI: 10.2307/352838
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352838
Page Count: 10
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Women with Multiple Roles: Role-Compatibility Perceptions, Satisfaction, and Mental Health
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Abstract

This study examines alternative models of how women combine perceptions of role conflict and enhancement. The role perception continuum model proposes that perceptions of enhancement and conflict are best represented on a continuum anchored by conflict and enhancement, on the assumption that these perceptions are mutually exclusive. The role perception typology model proposes that these perceptions can occur simultaneously and are best represented by a typology reflecting the four possibilities obtained by combining high and low scores on these two dimensions. Data were from a 1985 random sample of 158 married women college professors and middle-level managers. All had a preschool child. Findings supported the typology model rather than the continuum model. Perceptions of conflict and enhancement were weakly associated, which implies that they can occur simultaneously. Further analyses showed that location in the typology also predicted mental health and role satisfaction. Women experiencing high enhancement and low conflict scored highest on measures of mental health and role satisfaction, whereas those experiencing low enhancement and high conflict scored lowest. Results are discussed in terms of the issues they raise for the conceptualization of role perceptions.

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