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Marital Noncohabitation: Separation Does Not Make the Heart Grow Fonder

Ronald R. Rindfuss and Elizabeth Hervey Stephen
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 52, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 259-270
DOI: 10.2307/352856
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352856
Page Count: 12
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Marital Noncohabitation: Separation Does Not Make the Heart Grow Fonder
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Abstract

A variety of situations may arise in which husbands and wives live in separate households, temporarily or permanently, for reasons other than marital discord. Such living arrangements may have far-reaching implications, and perhaps the most important question is whether living apart from one's spouse leads to divorce. The percentage of currently married persons living apart in the United States is highest for ages 18-24 and for blacks. The two most common identifiable reasons for husbands and wives not living together are military service and incarceration. We found that those living apart from their spouses in 1976 were nearly twice as likely to experience a marital dissolution within three years, compared with persons cohabiting with their spouses.

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