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Sons, Daughters, and Intergenerational Social Support

Glenna Spitze and John Logan
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 52, No. 2 (May, 1990), pp. 420-430
DOI: 10.2307/353036
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353036
Page Count: 11
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Abstract

This study examines the effects of the number and gender composition of children on the receipt of social support by older persons. Effects vary with type of support: having daughters is most salient for telephone contact, while frequency of visiting is affected by both gender and number of children. Living with children is influenced by the number but not gender of children. Finally, the key to receiving help is having at least one daughter, but there is no advantage of additional children of either gender. Gender effects may be most salient for types of social support that can be provided without the participation of the helper's family. Findings are discussed in relation to models previously applied to support from different types of primary groups.

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