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Self-Concept Disconfirmation, Psychological Distress, and Marital Happiness

Robert B. Schafer, K. A. S. Wickrama and Patricia M. Keith
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 58, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 167-177
DOI: 10.2307/353385
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353385
Page Count: 11
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Self-Concept Disconfirmation, Psychological Distress, and Marital Happiness
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Abstract

Using self-verification and self-discrepancy theories, this research tests a model of subjective and objective self-disconfirmation, self-efficacy, depression, and marital happiness. This research expands the issue of self-validation by evaluating the role of self-efficacy in the relationship between self-disconfirmation and depression, and the effect of self-concept disconfirmation on marital relationships. Data were analyzed from interviews with 155 couples. For husbands, objective self-concept disconfirmation had an estimated effect on marital happiness mediated through self-efficacy and depression. For wives, subjective self-concept disconfirmation had an estimated effect on marital happiness mediated through depression. Perceived and actual disconfirming appraisals from a spouse may affect the self-concept and the relationship in which disconfirmation occurs.

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