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Gender of Siblings, Cognitive Achievement, and Academic Performance: Familial and Nonfamilial Influences on Children

Jay Teachman
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 59, No. 2 (May, 1997), pp. 363-374
DOI: 10.2307/353476
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353476
Page Count: 12
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Gender of Siblings, Cognitive Achievement, and Academic Performance: Familial and Nonfamilial Influences on Children
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Abstract

In this article, I use data on twins to obtain estimates of the degree of shared familial influence on cognitive achievement and academic performance. The results indicate that there is considerable shared influence on cognitive achievement but much less for academic performance. The model estimated also indicates a considerable degree of sibling symmetry in both outcomes. The only significant difference rests between opposite-gender twins. For these twins, nonshared sources of influence are more important than for same-gender twins. Finally, the results indicate that the regression of academic performance on cognitive achievement is not biased by unmeasured familial characteristics.

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