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Food Habits of Golden Eagles in Eastern Washington

N. Verne Marr and Richard L. Knight
The Murrelet
Vol. 64, No. 3 (Winter, 1983), pp. 73-77
DOI: 10.2307/3535265
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3535265
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Food Habits of Golden Eagles in Eastern Washington
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Abstract

We studied fall and winter food habits of adult and immature Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) as well as the composition and biomass of prey found in nests in eastern Washington during 1974-1981. Bird and mammal remains occurred with almost equal frequencies at nests, but mammals dominated in terms of biomass. Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) were the most important food of nestling eagles, both in frequency and biomass. Number of prey species and number of prey items found at nests were not related to the number of different habitats within a 2-km radius of the nest. Carrion appeared to be the most important fall and winter food of Golden Eagles with waterfowl and gallinaceous birds less important.

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