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The Course of Marital Success and Failure in Five American 10-Year Marriage Cohorts

Norval D. Glenn
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 60, No. 3 (Aug., 1998), pp. 569-576
DOI: 10.2307/353529
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353529
Page Count: 8
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The Course of Marital Success and Failure in Five American 10-Year Marriage Cohorts
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Abstract

Using a repeated cross-sectional design to trace marital success and failure in five American 10-year marriage cohorts from 1973 to 1994 reveals no convincing evidence of an increase in aggregate-level marital success at any duration in the first five decades after first marriage. The higher mean level of marital quality in late-term than in mid-term marriages shown by cross-sectional studies apparently results largely from cohort differences in marital success.

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