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Race and Ethnic Variation in Norms of Filial Responsibility among Older Persons

Jeffrey A. Burr and Jan E. Mutchler
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 61, No. 3 (Aug., 1999), pp. 674-687
DOI: 10.2307/353569
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353569
Page Count: 14
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Race and Ethnic Variation in Norms of Filial Responsibility among Older Persons
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Abstract

Race and ethnic diversity in attachment to the norms of intergenerational filial responsibility is examined in a sample of older persons drawn from the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH). The findings show that older Blacks and Hispanics are more likely than older non-Hispanic Whites to agree that each generation should provide coresidence assistance when needed. In terms of attitudes about exchanging financial aid, there tend to be fewer differences between each group. Moreover, in a longitudinal analysis of living arrangements, the impact of race on the likelihood of living with an adult child is reduced to statistical insignificance when variation in commitment to norms governing coresidence is controlled.

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