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Journal Article

Father-Child Relations, Mother-Child Relations, and Offspring Psychological Well-Being in Early Adulthood

Paul R. Amato
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 56, No. 4 (Nov., 1994), pp. 1031-1042
DOI: 10.2307/353611
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353611
Page Count: 12
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Father-Child Relations, Mother-Child Relations, and Offspring Psychological Well-Being in Early Adulthood
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Abstract

The present study, based on a national sample of 471 young adults, finds that closeness to fathers makes a unique contribution to offspring happiness, life satisfaction, and psychological distress. Parental divorce weakens the salience of the father-child relationship for adult children's life satisfaction. Similarly, marriage, parenthood, and full-time employment diminish the salience of both the mother-child and the father-child relationship for offspring well-being. Closeness to stepfathers is also related to some dimensions of offspring well-being. Overall, these findings suggest that fathers are important figures in the lives of young adults.

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