Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Racial Differences in Men's Attitudes about Women's Gender Roles

Kathleen M. Blee and Ann R. Tickamyer
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 21-30
DOI: 10.2307/353813
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353813
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Racial Differences in Men's Attitudes about Women's Gender Roles
Preview not available

Abstract

This article investigates three aspects of male gender role development, using linked mother-son files from the young men and mature women cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys from the mid-1960s to 1981. The three aspects are: (a) race differences between African American and White men's attitudes about women's gender roles, (b) changes in gender role attitudes across time, and (c) maternal and life course influences on gender role attitudes. Our findings indicate that African American and White men differ in their attitudes about women's gender roles, that men's beliefs change across time, and that individual status and life course processes influence these attitudes of men. However, we do not find maternal influence on adult sons' attitudes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30