Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Gender Ideology, Marital Disruption, and the Employment of Married Women

Theodore N. Greenstein
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 31-42
DOI: 10.2307/353814
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353814
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Gender Ideology, Marital Disruption, and the Employment of Married Women
Preview not available

Abstract

The present research studies the process through which gender ideology moderates the effects of wives' employment on marital stability. A model proposed here suggests that gender ideology functions as a lens through which inequalities in the division of household labor are viewed. Non-traditional women are hypothesized to view these inequalities as unjust because they view marriage as an egalitarian partnership, while traditional women do not perceive these inequalities as inherently unfair. Marital stability is presumed to be linked to perceptions of the fairness of the marital relationship. The model is confirmed by results from piecewise-constant exponential models of marital disruption for the 3,284 women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth who experienced a first marriage between 1979 and 1990. Number of hours of paid employment per week is negatively related to marital stability for women holding nontraditional gender ideologies, but not for women with traditional views.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42