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Journal Article

The Effect of Marriage, Family, and Religious Ties on African American Suicide Ideology

Steven Stack and Ira Wasserman
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Feb., 1995), pp. 215-222
DOI: 10.2307/353829
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353829
Page Count: 8
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The Effect of Marriage, Family, and Religious Ties on African American Suicide Ideology
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Abstract

This article explores the influence of marriage and family factors, including religiosity, on suicide beliefs or ideology using a national sample of African Americans (n = 1,197). Being married lowers pro-suicide ideology; however, having children does not. Institutional ties to religion are found to be considerably more important than marital ties in lowering pro-suicide ideology among African Americans. The model is replicated for Whites. Collective institutions tend to lower pro-suicide ideology less for African Americans than for Whites. The full model explains twice as much variation in suicide ideology among Whites as among African Americans.

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