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Socialization in the Family of Origin and Male Dating Violence: A Prospective Study

Ronald L. Simons, Kuei-Hsiu Lin and Leslie C. Gordon
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 60, No. 2 (May, 1998), pp. 467-478
DOI: 10.2307/353862
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353862
Page Count: 12
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Socialization in the Family of Origin and Male Dating Violence: A Prospective Study
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Abstract

The most popular explanations for dating violence posit that it is learned in the family of origin. We specify several theoretical perspectives regarding the manner in which parental behavior might increase the probability that an adolescent will engage in dating violence. The theories were tested with panel data from a sample of 113 adolescent males. Structural equation modeling was employed to assess the extent to which various parental behaviors during early adolescence predict high school dating violence. Although frequent exposure to corporal punishment increased the risk of dating violence, this was not the case for interparental aggression, which did not predict dating violence. Low support and involvement by parents was associated with adolescent delinquency and drug use, which, in turn, predicted involvement in dating violence.

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