Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Relationship of Cohabitation and Mental Health: A Study of a Young Adult Cohort

Allan V. Horwitz and Helene Raskin White
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 60, No. 2 (May, 1998), pp. 505-514
DOI: 10.2307/353865
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353865
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Relationship of Cohabitation and Mental Health: A Study of a Young Adult Cohort
Preview not available

Abstract

Despite the growing importance of and interest in cohabitation as a living arrangement, little is known about the relationship between cohabitation and mental health. This research tests how the mental health of cohabitors compares with that of unmarried and of married persons. It uses a cohort of unmarried young adults who were sampled when they were 18, 21, or 24 years old and resampled 7 years later when they were 25, 28, or 31 years old. We compare the mental health of cohabitors with the unmarried and married after controlling for premarital levels of mental health and conventionality. The results of multivariate analyses indicate no differences between cohabitors and others in levels of depression. Cohabiting men, however, report significantly more alcohol problems than both married and single men, and cohabiting women report more alcohol problems than married women. In general, the results indicate that cohabitation is unrelated to depression but is associated with alcohol problems for men.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
505
    505
  • Thumbnail: Page 
506
    506
  • Thumbnail: Page 
507
    507
  • Thumbnail: Page 
508
    508
  • Thumbnail: Page 
509
    509
  • Thumbnail: Page 
510
    510
  • Thumbnail: Page 
511
    511
  • Thumbnail: Page 
512
    512
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514