Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Adolescent Birth Intentions, Social Disadvantage, and Behavioral Outcomes

Katherine Trent and Kyle Crowder
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 59, No. 3 (Aug., 1997), pp. 523-535
DOI: 10.2307/353943
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353943
Page Count: 13
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Adolescent Birth Intentions, Social Disadvantage, and Behavioral Outcomes
Preview not available

Abstract

Data from the U.S. National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience of Youth are used to examine the extent to which group differentials in early nonmarital childbearing are a function of normative differences in fertility intentions. We find that, like adolescent and nonmarital childbearing, birth intentions do vary by race and ethnicity, poverty status, and family structure. However, although birth intentions significantly influence birth outcomes, they do not substantially reduce the effects of race and ethnicity, poverty status, and family background. Furthermore, the effect of intentions on birth outcomes is not significantly greater for more socially disadvantaged adolescents.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
  • Thumbnail: Page 
528
    528
  • Thumbnail: Page 
529
    529
  • Thumbnail: Page 
530
    530
  • Thumbnail: Page 
531
    531
  • Thumbnail: Page 
532
    532
  • Thumbnail: Page 
533
    533
  • Thumbnail: Page 
534
    534
  • Thumbnail: Page 
535
    535