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Adult Children Taking Parents into Their Homes: Effects of Childhood Living Arrangements

Maximiliane Szinovacz
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 59, No. 3 (Aug., 1997), pp. 700-717
DOI: 10.2307/353955
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353955
Page Count: 18
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Adult Children Taking Parents into Their Homes: Effects of Childhood Living Arrangements
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Abstract

This article explores whether childhood living arrangements (living with single or remarried parents, exposure to extended households) impact attitudes toward and implementation of parental coresidence. The results indicate that positive attitudes toward parental coresidence are less common among those raised by single fathers and more common among women exposed to traditional extended households. Parental coresidence is more prevalent among men and women raised by single or remarried mothers, as well as men living with single fathers, and less common among individuals living with remarried fathers.

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